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Hi to all our members ... We  would just like to draw your attention to the latest post on the following link... Thank you for your attention .If you have already responded to my note  on Chatbox  about this please ignore this sticky note ... Thanks  folks ....

http://www.tipf.co.uk/forums/topic/46369-important~-the-forum-its-future-and-finances/

Clicker and Ryewolf   ADMIN TEAM 

Regretfully we have to once again ask members for  some financial support in order to  keep TIPF  running till December 2023. The more pledges we have to become  FRIEND OF THE FORUM  the less the individual cost will be so  if you want this Forum to continue  please follow the link below  and decide  if you are able to  support us . Thank you all for your support in the past ... it has been appreciated  a great deal ...

https://www.tipf.co.uk/forums/topic/57184-202223-forum-finances-update-important-notice/

 Clicker and Ryewolf  ...  Admin Team 

Hi TIPFers 

I AM HERE AGAIN WITH THE  BEGGING BOWL TO ENSURE THE FORUM CAN KEEP GOING ... Please follow  below if you want to  support the continuation  of this Forum and  this  small but friendly community. 

As always your support is  both vital and appreciated ...

 Clicker and Ryewolf ...

https://www.tipf.co.uk/forums/topic/57184-202223-forum-finances-update-4th-july-2023/

 

Please note  there is an important notice to read regarding the future of this site ... see link below :-

https://www.tipf.co.uk/forums/topic/60475-tipf-will-be-closing-down-on-30th-june-2024/

Thank  you

Clicker and Ryewolf.   Admin 

 

St Michael’s on Wyre Church


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St Michael’s Church is old enough to be mentioned in the Domesday Book as ‘Michelescherce’.

Bounded by the River Wyre, it has been called St Michaels-on-Wyre since the 1100s. The earliest parts of the present building are Norman, as can be evidenced by the door on its north side. The site is even older though and there has probably been a church here since Saxon times.

The church is typical of late Medieval churches of northern England and is constructed of sandstone ashlar and rubble. The plan consists of a tower at the west end, a chancel and nave under a continuous roof and a chapel to the north. The tower is said to date from 1549.

 

 

Paul.

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