Jump to content
Clicker

The Malthouse through the long window

Recommended Posts

Another  photo taken at Harvington Hall  from a window in the Withdrawing Room   As you can see ...I do not need any cracked plaster texture overlays here .... The Malthouse and kiln  is the building seen from this window....

1123966276_DSCF7889ed1s.thumb.jpg.a3efd28889dcda7562c86190eecb6d2e.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

I like this - feels "homely".

Paul.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post

Very nice!  The exposure is very well-balanced - is it HDR?

Share this post


Link to post

No It isnt HDR  Gareth   but I did  use a few layers to lighten  the recess just a little and   the candlestick  and a neutral density filter  in Colour FX PRO in the Nik collection ... I ve just checked back on the workflow I did actually add some texture to the wall on the left, even though it was pretty cracked ... Here is the original pic out the camera ...

DSCF7889sooc.thumb.jpg.8932bc0c3a09679fe0838dbaf5d492aa.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

A good job with the editing then!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

A great bit of PP work there, Clicks, very nice indeed.

The addition of the texture has made a great difference to the final image - must admit I'd never thought of adding texture to just one element of a photograph.

Korky

PS - Thanks for setting up the Weekly Challenge poll. Appreciated!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
54 minutes ago, Korky said:

A great bit of PP work there, Clicks, very nice indeed.

The addition of the texture has made a great difference to the final image ……………………………………………………………………

Couldn't agree more.   IMHO, really good images result from attention to detail and the finish.  All apparent here.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks guys for your input and comments on the editing ... I like to show the before and after  sometimes as I hope it shows that  very often, post  processing can be the icing on the cake ... I rarely see the finished picture through the lens but I do usually have a good idea of how I want it to look at the end of the process ...  I have nought but respect and admiration for those of you who can make it happen just with the camera  but us lesser mortals  have to slap a bit of warpaint on before we look our best !!!  🎨

Korks ... I often use textures using the transform perspective or skew option after moving a texture layer over the  pic in question... I t means that you can make the texture follow the same perspective as the item you are covering. Eg  a window sill or table ...   if that makes sense .... 

Share this post


Link to post

I really like the feeling of depth. It's also nice to be on a forum where PP isn't regarded as a sin.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

P.S. the window needs a clean.   :rolleyes: 

Edited by John2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks MM....    I know there are places where it seems that post production work is considered almost  like cheating .... ...   I think you’ll find enough room on here to accommodate most genres of photography  ...  👍

Share this post


Link to post
20 hours ago, Clicker said:

Thanks MM....    I know there are places where it seems that post production work is considered almost  like cheating .... ...   I think you’ll find enough room on here to accommodate most genres of photography  ...  👍

Thank you for sharing your excellent pp skills, Polly. I must try the transform option on a texture layer if I can work it out. 

Share this post


Link to post

I can do a tutorial for here if you want ...on the before and after Forum    Have you looked at the one I did before Cheryl ... ? See the link ...

 

 if you go to the 11th screen grab ( I should really go and number them ) and instead of going to transform> scale  go to transform > perspective.( Or sometimes “skew “ is appropriate)  and that enables you to pull the individual corners of the textured layer to the shape you want which in turn gives proper perspective to the texture you are placing it on .. its ideal for walls and architectural images as you can pull it about to fit the shape you want to texturise ...  I hope this helps  but please yell if it needs more explaining ...  it’s sometimes hard to gauge what people know and I don’t want  to rabbit on unnecessarily  lol ... 

Thanks  for the kind comments  too ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Very nice subject Polly, and very interesting to see the difference before and after you added the texture.

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks Dee... I think some subjects are sometimes really suitable  for using  texture overlays  but as I said earlier ...it’s not everyone’s cup of tea.... . ☕

Share this post


Link to post

THank you for the tutorial Polly. Makes sense. I’ll try it and post the results.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×